Cold and flu season are here, there are some ways to prevent getting sick and they can come from simply changing your diet. It may not be an apple a day keeps the doctor away but there are some foods you can add to your diet to keep the cold bugs at bay.

Acai Berry

Acai berry’s dark color signals that it is high in antioxidants called anthocyanins. Antioxidants help your body fight aging and disease. Acai berries are usually found in juice or smoothie form, or dried and mixed with granola.

Almonds

Just 1/4 cup of Almonds has almost 50% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin E. Vitamin E helps boost the immune system. Almonds also contain riboflavin and niacin; B vitamins that may help you bounce back from the effects of stress.

Grapefruit

If you are looking to boost your vitamin C intake, grapefruits are a great way to fights off colds and flu. Grapefruit is also packed with flavonoids. Flavonoids are natural chemical compounds that have been shown to increase immune system activation.

Wheat Germ

Wheat germ contains zinc, antioxidants, and B vitamins among other vital vitamins and minerals. Wheat germ has fiber, protein, and good fat. You can substitute wheat germ for some part of regular flour in baked goods and other recipes. You can also mix it in with breadcrumbs in meatballs or meatloaf.

Oysters

When you hear oyster you think aphrodisiac but oysters are also known as immune boosters. Oysters contain the mineral zinc. Zinc has an antiviral effect, which aids in healing wounds.

Cabbage

Cabbage is a fantastic source of immune-strengthening glutamine.  It is easy to add cabbage to soups and stews to boost nutritional value.

Watermelon

Also containing the powerful antioxidant glutathione is watermelon. Glutathione is found in the red pulpy flesh near the rind.

Elderberry

Rich in antioxidants, elderberry is thought to fight inflammation. The extract from these dark berries appears to block flu viruses in test tube studies.

Button Mushrooms

Mushrooms boast the mineral selenium and antioxidants. Boosting selenium levels help to fight off severe flu symptoms. The B vitamins riboflavin and niacin, also found in these mushrooms, play a role in a healthy immune system.

 

 

More and more millennials are getting into the housing market. A survey by homebuilder PulteGroup found that 65% of those who make more than $50,000 a year reported increased interest in buying a home.

The recession has forced Generation Y, roughly those age 18 to 34, to delay buying homes. Now millennials are now entering their thirties and the cost of buying a home is now becoming a reality.

While student loans and financial resources are keeping some younger people from the housing market many others are realizing that in many cases owning a home is cheaper than renting.

The survey also reported that millennials know what they want in a home:

84% listed storage as a priority was ample storage              
76% want space for TV and movie watching                                                                        
69% desire an open living/room kitchen layout                                                                          
63% look for outdoor living or a deck                                                                                            
36% cited the ability to work at home

Other recent studies have affirmed the PulteGroup study and have shown that 90% of millennials plan to buy a home someday keeping the dream of homeownership alive.                                                    

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The kitchen stove is a common cause of fire in the home. The usual culprit of a stove top fire is grease which can be very dangerous and can spread quickly. It is important to know how to react when a grease fire happens.

Here are some tips for putting out a stove top fire, should it happen to you:

If the fire starts from grease in a pan, put a metal lid on top of the pan to smother the flames. Turn off the burner but don’t move the pan. Leave the lid on until the fire is completely extinguished.

If you have it handy you can use baking soda to put out the fire. Never use water on a grease fire, it will make it worse.

An ABC, dry chemical fire extinguisher can also be used effectively on grease fires. It is important to keep a small multi-purpose extinguisher in an easily accessible area of your kitchen.

Never try to carry the fire outside. Moving the pan may cause the grease to splash, spread the fire, and cause burns.

In case of an oven fire, turn off the oven and leave the door closed. After the fire is out, let the oven cool completely.

If the fire becomes more than you can handle, leave and call 911 from a neighbor’s house.

Moving can be stressful. The best way to not get overwhelmed is to have an organized plan and a step-by-step timeline. A little preparation will help make the move go a lot smoother.

Here is a checklist to help keep you on track:

60 Days Before You Move

  • Sort and Purge-Go through every room, decide what needs to come with you and what can go. Make piles of things to throw away and things to donate.
  • Plan a Yard Sale-Start planning a yard sale to reduce the amount of stuff you need to move. Some extra money for the move will also come in handy.
  • Hire a Mover-Contact at least three moving companies. On-site estimates are better than over the phone or internet estimates. Get each estimate in writing, and make sure it has a USDOT (U.S. Department of Transportation) number on it.
  • Create a Moving Binder-Store all of your move-related paperwork (checklists, contracts, receipts) in a binder. You may also want to inventory all of your items with photos or lists.

Six Weeks Before Your Move

  • Get Packing Supplies-Determine how many packing supplies you’ll need and designate a room where you can begin to store and organize.
  • Take Measurements-If possible get room dimensions of your new home. Make sure large pieces of furniture will fit.  Don’t forget to take measurements for appliances too.

30 Days Before Your Move

  • Confirm with Mover-Check with your mover the details of your move.
  • Start Packing-Begin packing out-of-season clothes and unnecessary items.
  • Label-Make sure to label boxes with what rooms the boxes will go in at your new home.
  • Start/Stop Utilities-Make arrangements to connect and disconnect your cable, internet and utilities.
  • Change your Address- Contact or visit your local Post Office to obtain a Change of Address form. You can also obtain this form online at http://www.usps.com.
  • Make Notifications- Change your address to the following: registry of motor vehicles, banks, schools, friends & family, insurance companies, doctors and specialists, cell phone providers, credit card companies and magazine and newspapers.
  • Contact Service Providers—Notify landscapers, cleaning services that you are moving, and look for new ones in your new hometown.

Two Weeks Before Your Move

  • Call Locksmith- Have your new home’s locks changed on moving day or before.
  • Arrange Services- Have a cleaning company prepare the new home before you arrive and tidy the old home after you leave. Arrange for carpet cleaning too.
  • Pack the bulk of your items.
  • Start Cleaning-Begin cleaning any rooms in your house that have been emptied, such as closets, basements or attics.

One Week Before Your Move

  • Pack Suitcases- Finish your general packing a few days before your moving date. Pack suitcases for everyone in the family with enough clothes to wear for a few days.
  • Gather Keys- Organize all keys, alarm codes and garage door openers so that you can be prepared to hand them over to the new owner or real estate agent.

A Few Days Before Your Move

  • Defrost the Freezer- Empty, clean and defrost the freezer at least 24 hours before moving day.
  • Make Payment Plans- You will need to make sure you have made arrangements to pay the mover and have a tip (usually 10%-15%).

Moving Day

  • List Contact Info- Write out a list for your movers of things they’ll need: phone numbers, exact moving address and maps.
  • Take Inventory- Before the movers leave, sign the bill of lading/inventory list and keep a copy.
  • Walk-Through- Do a walk-through of your new home with your real estate agent.
  • Layout New Home- Tape names to doors to assist movers in placing furniture and boxes.
  • Have Director- Arrange for someone to direct the movers at your new home.

 

 

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